Tag Archives: Design

I know that many of you saw this bath featured in World of Interiors. I would be remiss if I did not comment on this completely original Art Deco design: it is perfection.  The New York City apartment, a penthouse with 30 rooms on Gracie Square with views in several directions, was owned by Conde Nast. The design elements of the bath and the entire apartment fall well within the decorative arts framework made popular in the 1920s and 1930s in France. The influences were informed by contemporary design themes from LeCorbusier and Walter Gropius, historical excesses and exuberant wrought iron floral designs of Edgar Brandt, organic forms from Hector Guimard and crisp angularities from Charles Rennie Mackintosh are evident in the etched glass.

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There is not a lot of inspired shopping anywhere, especially when it comes to the big global brands.  Clearly, that is a bold statement, (and my opinion); generally there is repetitive design, poor lighting and uninspired merchandise. I experienced a paradigm shift last week when I visited the newly opened Loewe shop in the Miami Design District.

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VERY RICH & HANDSOME is the name of an exhibition at the Hirschl & Adler Galleries in the Crown Building at 730 Fifth Avenue, New York. As part of my museum and antiques show hopping in New York in January, I especially wanted to see this extraordinary group of American Neo-Classical decorative arts. The title of the show was extracted from an 1820 document by Abby Breese Salisbury who described a group of furniture she had commissioned from the Boston cabinet making firm of Issac Vose & Son in the early days of the 19th century. While great furniture was made in Boston at that time, other cabinetmaking centers were well established New York, Baltimore and Philadelphia. The show has examples from all of these centers and each piece is more refined and elegant than the next.

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Last week I wrote about cement tile. I wanted to continue that post with some images to demonstrate that one pattern often equals many design opportunities with a simple change of color and a quarter or half turn of the tile to disrupt the pattern flow.

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