Tag Archives: Design

I have a rigorous set of criteria for selecting any object whether it’s a chair, silver or a bath fitting. First I look at the object as a whole. I ask myself if the proportions are pleasing, if I like the form and shape, and if the details are appropriate. Do I love the way it looks and is it good design? First, you must choose your personal style and ask yourself if the fitting you are considering is the best in its category. Do you love modern, transitional or traditional? Is your preference for Edwardian English, French country or American 40’s modern? You also have to weigh the various options for finishes. Unlacquered brass will take on a beautiful worn patina, but a place by the salt water will turn the fitting green quickly.Chrome is the most durable. Nickel is a soft, warm finish that needs proper maintenance and oil rubbed bronze is a hardy finish that seems site specific. Finally, ask yourself if you’ll love it in ten years. Achieving good design is a process. Design thinking assumes the designer has defined issues of scale and proportion as well as mechanical needs and discovered new opportunities each time she put pencil to paper. The result is a fitting whose design intention is clear, is graphically interesting, and feels effortless and spontaneous. Fittings are designed to be used endlessly. Make certain its’ function is as good as its’ looks. Does the handle move with a fluid motion? Will it deliver enough water? Will you hit your head every time you bend down to wash your face? Things speak to us through their shape, contour and surface. Does the fitting you’re considering hold together as one fluid statement? Often bath showrooms display hundreds of choices. Ultimately, your job is to edit. Sorting through the options can be daunting. The Internet is a terrific place to do initial research. However, the most satisfying results come from aligning yourself with an experienced and well trained sales consultant. I encourage you to make her a member of your team. Look at the fitting as you will see it in your space. Look down on it. Imagine it as a complement to the surface material on your sink or counter. And, finally, do not compromise on quality. There is nothing more beautiful than a meticulously crafted fitting. It’s the first thing you touch in the morning and the last at night. It should feel great and be timeless. For additional information on .25, Easton and Opus fittings, please visit Waterworks. Images courtesy of: Patrick Sutton, Martha Stewart, and Remodelista.

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A splash of red immediately impacts the richness and vibrancy of a space. Dennis Kyte, architect, designer, friend, client and serial remodeler, made this point abundantly clear in his Washington, Connecticut master bath by placing two simple, yet sassy, red leather mid-century chairs at the foot of his bathtub.

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A mirror in the bath is an essential element. It is a necessary grooming tool. The mirror also reflects light and seems to enlarge a space.

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More than likely your powder bath is the smallest room in your house. But small should have personality and be as stylish and attentively decorated as the rest of your house. I like to think of the powder room as a place to experiment with color, pattern and texture. This may be just the place to really live out some decorating fantasy you have been harboring. Wallpaper, paint, ceramic tile, stone and wood are some of the options you might select for the walls.

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